Departments and Programs

Africana Studies Educational Studies Modern Languages & Literatures
Anthropology & Sociology English Music
Archaeology Environmental Sciences Neuroscience
Art & Art History Environmental Studies Philosophy
Asian Studies Gender & Sexuality Studies Physics
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Greek & Roman Studies Political Economy
Biology History Politics & Law 
Business International Studies Psychology
Chemistry Latin American Studies Religious Studies
Computer Science Media Studies Urban Studies
Economics Mathematics  

AFRICANA STUDIES

Degree offered:   Major and Minor

Major:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Total Credits Required for Major:  44

Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Total Credits Required for Minor:  24

Elective courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • Africana Studies 105 Introduction to Africana Studies
  • Africana Studies 220 Martin, Malcolm, Baldwin and America
  • Anthropology/Sociology 331 Race and Ethnicity in American Society
  • Anthropology/Sociology 333 Sociology of Hip Hop
  • Education 225 African American Experiences in U.S. Schools
  • English 224 Survey of African American Literature (F4)
  • English 265 Special Topics in African American Literature(F2)
  • History 105 Special Topics in African or African American History (F2, F3)
  • History 205 Special Topics in African or African American History
  • History 105 Terrorism, Torture, and Anti-Colonialism: The Algerian War of Independence
  • History 242 African-American History (F3, F9)
  • History 243 The Civil Rights Movement (F3)
  • History 271 Africa Before 1800(F3, F9)
  • Humanities 201 Slavery and Capitalism
  • Music 118 African American Music (F5, F9)
  • Music 120 The History of the Blues(F3, F5)
  • Political Science 206 Urban Politics and Policy
  • Religious Studies 101 The Bible and African American History and Culture
  • Religious Studies 102 The Bible and Black Lives Matter
  • Religious Studies 259 Martin Luther King and the Modern Civil Rights Movement(F1)
  • Urban Studies 265 The Black Community and Law Enforcement

Courses required for the major and minor and appropriate for beginning students:

  • History 242 African American History (F3, F9)
  • English 224 African American Literature (F9, F4)
  • Africana Studies 105 Introduction to Africana Studies (F9)

Required courses in other departments:

  • English 224 African American Literature(F9, F4)
  • History 242 African American History (F3, F9)
  • International Studies 251 Government and Politics in African

Courses that close quickly:

  • History 242 African American History  (F3, F9)
  • Anthropology/Sociology 331 Race and Ethnicity in American Society
  • Anthropology/Sociology 333 Sociology of Hip Hop
  • English 224 Survey of African American Literature (F4)
  • Music 118 African American Music (F5, F9)
  • Music 120 History of the Blues(F3, F5)
  • Religious Studies 259 Martin Luther King and the Modern Civil Rights Movement(F1)
  • Africana Studies 220 Martin, Malcolm, Baldwin, and America 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • Africana Studies 105 then Africana Studies 305

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Additional Notes:

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ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  50
Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 103 Introductory Anthropology(F9)
  • 105 Introductory Sociology (F8)
  • All 200-level courses are appropriate for beginning students. These courses explore various topics in anthrolpology and sociology and require no special background. All 200-level ANSO courses count towards a major or minor in Anthropology and Sociology. Most 200-level courses fulfill the F8 or F9. 

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 103 Introductory Anthropology (F9)
  • 105 Introductory Sociology (F8)

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Courses in other disciplines that complement the foci of Anthropology and Sociology on human origins, early and contemporary cultures, the relationship between humans and their social, built, and natural environments, social stratification (race, class, gender, ethnicity), and social institutions.
  • Some courses offered under the following programs: Africana Studies, Archaeology, Environmental Studies, Latin American and Latinx Studies, Urban Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies
  • Language Courses

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Second semester sophomore year

AP credit:      No                  

Courses that close quickly:

  • 103 Introductory Anthropology (F9)
  • 105 Introductory Sociology (F8)

 Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NA

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • NA 

Additional Notes:

  • Students intending to major in the department are required to take both ANSO 103 Introduction to Anthropology (F9) and ANSO 105 Introduction to Sociology (F8).  These courses do not need to be taken in sequence.  (These Introductory courses are not open to seniors.) 
  • Students intending to pursue pre-medical studies are encouraged to take Introductory Sociology as the MCAT includes a section on social foundations of behavior
  • Also appropriate for first-year and sophomore students are 
    • ANSO 201 Human Evolution(F9)
    • ANSO 211 Peoples of sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar
    • ANSO 215 The Final Frontier: Peopling and Peoples of the Pacific
    • ANSO 254 Archeological Methods
    • ANSO 265 Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology(check with course instructor)
    • ANSO 271 Ecological Anthropology
    • ANSO 290 Learning from Things: Material Culture Studies
    • These courses fulfill elective credit for minors and majors.  Because these courses have no prerequisites and are open to all students, it is the case that a first-year student in the fall semester might find themselves in a course with juniors and seniors, some of whom may be ANSO majors.
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ARCHAEOLOGY

Degree offered:  NA
Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Total Credits Required for Minor:  24

For questions about the Minor in Archaeology please contact a Program Committee Member:

  • Miriam Clinton, Department of Art and Art History
  • Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
  • Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Chair of the Archaeology Program
  • Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
  • Jon Russ, Department of Chemistry
  • Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

 


ART & ART HISTORY

Degree offered:  BA
Tracks:    Art, Art History, or Art & Art History
Total Credits Required for Major:  40, 40, 56
Minor:  Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 101 Introduction to Drawing (F5)
  • 102 Introduction to Digital Art(F5)
  • 105 Introduction to Painting (F5)
  • 107 Introduction to Sculpture (F5)
  • 116 Animation (F5)
  • 151 Survey of Western Art  (F3, F5)
  • 152 Survey of Contemporary Art (F3, F5)
  • 212 Introduction to Performance Art (F5)
  • 165 Special Topics in Art History (F5)
  • 166 Special Topics in Studio Art (F5)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 100- and 200-level courses. (See Catalogue for specific courses.)

Required courses in other departments:

  • N/A

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Languages; Urban Studies; Archaeology; Greek and Roman Studies; Media Studies; Cultural Studies.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Junior Year

AP credit:  Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • NA    

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 105, 205, 305 Painting
  • 107, 207, 307 Sculpture
  • 102(or 116), 202, 302 Digital Art 
  • 386, 485, 486

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • N/A

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Art 386- Experiments in Media & Methods must be taken in the spring of junior year
  • Art 485- Senior Seminar must be taken in the fall of senior year.
  • Art 486- Senior Thesis must be taken in the spring of senior year.

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • N/A 

Additional Notes:

  • For studio we recommend ART 101 (Drawing), ART 102(Digital), ART 105 (Painting) and ART 107 (Sculpture).  Any other 100-level and some 200-level courses are also appropriate. 
  • For art history we recommend ART 151 (History of Western Art) and ART 152 (Survey of Contemporary Art). Any other 100-level and most 200-level courses are also appropriate. Students should seek the advice of the relevant instructor.
  • Students with prior experience and/or AP credit should consult with individual faculty about the appropriate 200-level course to take in either studio or art history.

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ASIAN STUDIES 

Degree offered:  None
Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Total Credits Required for Minor:  20

Elective courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • History 105: World War II in Asian(F2, F3)
  • History 105: The Two Korea, Past and Present(F2, F3)
  • History 283: Modern China(F3, F9)
  • Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema(F5, F9)
  • Religious Studies 258: Buddhism(F1, F9)

Courses required for the minor and appropriate for beginning students:

  • The Asian Studies minor requires a “Primary” course from a list of nearly twenty courses available on campus in History, Art, Chinese, International Studies, Religious Studies, and Urban Studies. A list of all “Primary” Asian Studies courses is available in the Catalogue.

Required courses in other departments:

  • One primary Asian Studies course
  • One secondary Asian Studies course offered by a department other than that which provided the course that fulfilled the primary requirement. 
  • Three additional, 200+ level, approved by Asian Studies Department.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • N/A

AP credit:  No                      

Courses that close quickly:

  • N/A

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • N/A

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • N/A

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA 

Additional Notes:


BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  53-56
Minor:    No                          

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • CHEM 120/125L Foundations in Chemistry with Lab (F7)
  • BIOL 130/131L Introductory Biology I (in the first semester) (F7)
  • CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I (in the second semester)
  • Students who have a strong background in chemistry and biology and intend to major in BMB should consider taking both Introductory Biology (BIOL 130/131L) and Foundations of Chemistry (120/125L). Otherwise, it is okay to take one or the other, depending on which course they find most interesting.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • CHEM 120/125L Foundations in Chemistry with Lab (in the first semester)  (F7)
  • BIOL 130/131L Introductory Biology I (in the first semester) (F7)

Required courses in other departments:

  • BIOL 130/131L  Biology I with Lab (F7)
  • BIOL 140/141L Biology II with Lab
  • CHEM 120/125L Foundations in Chemistry with Lab (F7)
  • CHEM 211 & 212/212L Organic Chemistry I & II with Lab
  • CHEM 240/240L Analytical Chemistry with Lab
  • BIOL 325/325L Molecular Biology with Lab
  • CHEM 315 Biochemistry
  • BIOL 307 Cell Biology
  • One of the following:
    • COMP 141 Computer Science (F6); or MATH 122 Integral Calculus (F6); or
    • MATH 111 Intro to Applied Statistics(F6), PSYC 211 Statistical Methods(F6), or ECON 290 Probability and Statistics (F6)
  • Required courses offered directly through the BMB Program are:
    • BMB 310 Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology
    • BMB 485 or 486 Senior Seminar

Students are also required to choose two courses from the following list to fulfill the major where at least one must have a lab:

  • BIOL 204/204L Animal Development with Lab 
  • BIOL 301/301L Microbiology with Lab
  • BIOL 304/304L Genetics with Lab
  • BIOL 330 Virology/Immunology
  • BIOL 376 Molecular Neuroscience
  • BIOL 380 Topics in Biomedical Science
  • CHEM 311 Physical Chemistry
  • CHEM 406 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
  • CHEM 416 Mechanism of Drug Action
  • BMB 451 or 452 Research, 4 credits, may only satisfy one elective

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Additional Notes:

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BIOLOGY

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major: 57-59
Interdisciplinary Major: Biomathematics (See Catalogue for requirements)

  • Biomathematics
  • Environmental Sciences and Studies
  • Neuroscience
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Minor:     No         

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 105 Topics courses (F7). Designed for non-science majors, these courses do not count toward the biology major but do fulfill the F7 foundation general degree requirement. BIOL 105 courses cover biological principles and information through examination of a single thematic topic such as Cancer Biology, Biology for Global Citizens, Biology of the Mind, and Microbes & Human Affairs. These courses include lecture and a required laboratory. 
  • 120 Introduction to Environmental Sciences (F7). This course does not count toward the biology major, but may be used to fulfill a major or minor requirement in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies and fulfills the F7 foundation general degree requirement.  Suitable for non-majors with strong high school science backgrounds. This course includes lecture and a required laboratory. 
  • 130 Biology I Introductory Biology (F7). Required for Biology majors and fulfills the F7 foundation general degree requirement. Suitable for non-majors with strong high school science backgrounds. Students taking this lecture course must enroll in the accompanying laboratory (131L) at the same time. BIOL 130 and 131L are only offered in the fall semester.
  • 140 Biology II Introductory Biology. Required for Biology majors. Suitable for non-majors with strong high school science backgrounds. Students taking this lecture course must enroll in the accompanying laboratory (141) at the same time, and 140/141L are only offered in the spring semester. Both 130 Biology I and 131L are prerequisites to 140 Biology II and 1411L.  

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 130/131L Biology I and lab (F7)  
  • 140/141L Biology II and lab
  • 130/131L and 140/141L are the appropriate courses for students considering post graduate work in research, medicine or other health-related fields. Biology 130/131L are prerequisites for Biology 140/141L

Concentrations

When earning a major in biology, students choose upper-level courses that qualify the student for one of four concentrations in the major. Details on upper-level course requirements are described in the catalog.  

  • General Biology  

  • Integrative Biology 

  • Ecology Evolution Behavior 

  • Biomedical Sciences.  

Required courses in other departments:

  • CHEM 120/125L (F7) and 211
  • Statistic Course: MATH 111, MATH 211, ECON 290, or PSYC 211 (all F6)
  • Computatioal Course: MATH 115, MATH 122, MATH 214, INTD 225 (GIS), or COMP 141 or above (all F6)
  • Some options for upper-level courses are offered in other departments, such as CHEM 315, BMB310, NEURO 270. 

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • CHEM 212-212L, 240-240L
  • PHYS 109-110 or 111-112; 113L-114L

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Sophomore year (if no biology courses or cognates have been taken)

AP credit: Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

  • Students with AP credit in Biology are encouraged to talk to their adviser to gauge their readiness to take upper level courses in Biology. We often recommend that they take the Introductory Biology courses and give up their AP credit.

Courses that close quickly:

  • 105 Topics in Biology - Students with good academic records or strong science backgrounds or interest may take Bio 130/131L if 105 is closed. Others may be advised to wait for availability.
  • 120 Introduction to Environmental Science – Recommended for students with strong science backgrounds or interest.  If closed, such students may consider BIOL 130/131.
  • Upper Level Biology Classes - Most upper level biology classes (200 or higher) close quickly and must be listed as first choices on the registration Tree.

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 130/131L Biology I and lab must be taken before 140-141L Biology II and lab

Courses not to be taken concurrently:  NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:  

  • 130/131L Biology I and lab are only offered in the fall semester
  • 140/141L Biology II and lab are only offered in the spring semester
  • Many upper-level courses are only offered in the fall or spring semester. Work with your advisor to anticipate upper-level biology course offerings. 

Courses that don’t count toward a Biology major:

  • 104 Topics and 105(F7) Topics in Biology. Includes consortium classes at CBU.
  • 115/115L and 116/116L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II, with Lab normally taught in summer.
  • 120 Introduction to Environmental Science (F7)
  • 460 and 461 Internship in Biology 

Additional Notes:

  • The introductory Biology sequence begins only in the fall.
  • BIOL 120 Introduction to Environmental Sciences is closed to seniors and juniors.  Upper class students considering majoring or minoring in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies or with a strong interest in environmental sciences should speak to the ENVS Program Chair to request permission to enroll.  Other upper class students seeking to fulfill their F7 requirement should be encouraged to enroll in BIOL 105.
  • Students who have a very strong background in the sciences and intend to major in Biology or Chemistry may consider taking both the Introductory Biology (BIOL 130/131L and 140/141L) and Foundations of Chemistry and Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 120/125L and 211) one-year sequences in their first year. Otherwise, it is okay to take one or the other, depending on which major they are more inclined toward.
  • Students considering careers in any health profession or in veterinary medicine should communicate with one of the HPA directors within the first month of classes.
  • Many biology students engage in one-on-one mentored research for academic credit. When a total of four biology research credits are taken, it counts as one upper-level biology course with lab. 

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BUSINESS

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    General Business and International Business
Total Credits Required for Major:  46
Interdisciplinary Major:  Economics and Business – 62 credits
Minor:    Yes 

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • ECON 100  Introduction to Economics (F8)
  • BUS 241  Financial Accounting

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (F8)
  • BUS 241 - Financial Accounting and BUS 243 - Cost Accounting are required for Business majors (BUS 241 is a prerequisite for BUS 243).  Because of the nature of the material, these business courses require daily preparation. Students may take this sequence during their first year. Majors should complete these courses no later than the spring of their sophomore year. Students may take BUS 241 and ECON 100 at the same time.

Required courses in other departments:

  • MATH 115 Applied Calculus, MATH 116 Calculus with Business Applications or MATH 122 Integral Calculus. Required for Business and for Economics and Business majors. Students with adequate background in math may take MATH 115, 116 or 121 their first year.
  • ECON 290 Statistics for Economics and Business. This may be taken during a student's first year but not recommended the first semester. Starting in the fall of 2019, this is the only statistics course allowed for the major in Business as well as the interdisciplinary major in Business and Economics.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • INTD 240 – Effective Public Speaking
  • PHIL 206 – Logic
  • CS 141, 142 – Computer Science I and II

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Beginning of sophomore year

AP credit:   Yes for MATH 115 or 121 (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • All lower level courses 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • BUS 241 and 243
  • BUS 341 and 342
  • ECON 100, BUS 241, BUS 243 and ECON 290 are prerequisites or co-requisites for most upper-division courses. Note the specific provisions in the College Catalogue.

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Fall: BUS 345, 452, 463, 474, 481
  • Spring: BUS 448, 454, 466, 467, 472, 473, 486

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • BUS 345, 448, 460, 461

Additional Notes:

  • IMPORTANT NOTE - Students who think they might be interested in majoring in Business are highly encouraged to talk to a professor in the department before taking business courses. Proper sequencing of courses is very important in order to graduate on time.
  • BUS 460 – Internship is recommended

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CHEMISTRY

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:    American Chemical Society certified degree and Drug Design
Total Credits Required for Major:  56
Minor:    Yes                                         

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • CHEM 105 Topics in Chemistry (F7).  Designed for non-science majors. Chemical principles studied through thematic topics.
  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry (F7 when taken with 125 lab). A study of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry.  Topics to be considered include stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, acids and bases, kinetics, thermodynamics and solutions. Appropriate for students majoring in the sciences. Co-requisite: Chemistry 125L.

Courses required for major/minor and appropriate for beginning students:

  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry (F7).  Co-requisite: Chemistry 125L (laboratory).
  • CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry (F7). Appropriate for students interested in science but not sure of a major. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120.

Required courses in other departments:

  • MATH 112 or 122(F6) Pre and Differntial Calculus or Calculus 2. 
  • PHYS 109-110 Intro Physics for Life Sciences I & II or PHYS 111-112 Intro Physics for Physical Sciences I & II with lab (F6, F7)

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • COMP 141 Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals is not required but is very useful.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Sophomore Year

AP credit:  Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

  • Students will not be able to use AP credit to satisfy CHEM 120.
  • Students who score a 4 or 5 on the AP exam will receive 4 credits of CHEM 099.  CHEM 099 does not count for the Chemistry major, but those 4 credits will count towards graduation.

Courses that close quickly:

  • CHEM 105 Topics in Chemistry (F7)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry (F7), CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I (F7)

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • 120 Foundations and 211 Organic Chemistry

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • CHEM 105 Topics in Chemistry (F7)

Additional Notes:

  • Chemistry 211 is often offered in the summer.
  • Students planning on medical school should plan to take Chemistry 315 (Biochemistry) before taking the MCAT. In order to take 315 students need to take the prerequisites 120, 125L. 211 and 212. 240 is strongly recommended either before or concurrently with Biochemistry. These courses take three to four semesters to complete, so students should plan accordingly.
  • All students wishing to take courses in Chemistry should enroll in Foundations of Chemistry, as it is a preparation for Organic Chemistry I in the second semester.
  • Students who have a very strong background in the sciences and intend to major in Biology, Chemistry or Biochemistry and Molecular Biology may consider taking both Introductory Biology (BIOL 130/131L and 140/141L) and Foundations of Chemistry and Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 120/125L and 211) one-year sequences in their first year. Otherwise, it is okay to take one or the other, depending on which major they are more inclined toward.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  53
Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • COMP 141-Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals (F6)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • COMP 141-Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals(F6)

Required courses in other departments:

  • A calculus course, either Calculus I (MATH 112, 115, or 116), or Calculus II (MATH 122).
  • One additional mathematics course of the student's choice.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Additional mathematics courses such as Calculus III (MATH 223) or Linear Algebra (MATH 261).
  • A statistics course (MATH 211 is recommended, but PSYC 211 or ECON 290 may be appropriate for students interested in those discipline

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • COMP 141 should be taken as early as possible, preferably no later than spring of the first year.

AP credit:  Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

  • Students scoring a 4 or a 5 on the AP Computer Science A exam will receive credit for COMP 141 and may enroll in COMP 142.
  • Students who have taken the AP Computer Science Principles exam should contact a member of the Computer Science Department for placement

Courses that close quickly:

  • Most computer science courses, especially COMP 141, have high enrollment demands. Students should place computer science courses high on their registration trees.

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • COMP 141, 142, and 241 should be taken in sequence, preferably in consecutive semesters.

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • NA

Additional Notes:

If a student is interested in a computer science major or minor, and...

  • has no prior programming experience: enroll in COMP 141.
  • scored a 4 or 5 on the AP Computer Science A exam: enroll in COMP 142. Prospective majors shouldconsider enrolling in COMP 172 or COMP 231 at the same time as COMP 142 if their schedule allows.
  • has significant prior programming experience but has not taken the AP Computer Science A exam (or scored a 3 or lower): contact a member of the computer science faculty to discuss starting in COMP 142.
  • took the AP Computer Science Principles exam: contact a member of the computer science faculty to discuss placement.
  • Prospective computer science majors should enroll in the appropriate first programming course (COMP 141 or 142) as early as their schedule allows.Students thinking about graduate-level study in computer science should plan to take Calculus II (MATH 122) and are suggested to take Calculus III (MATH 223), Statistics (MATH 211) and Linear Algebra (MATH 260). These courses may also be helpful for math-intensive computer science careers such as in computer graphics, data science, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
  • More information about computer science is available at www.cs.rhodes.edu.

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ECONOMICS 

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    N/A
Total Credits Required for Major:  48
Interdisciplinary Majors: 

  • Economics/Commerce and Business – 64 credits
  • Economics and International Studies – 60-64 credits
  • Mathematics and Economics – 60 credits
  • Political Economy (an interdisciplinary program) – 48 credits

Minor:      Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • ECON 100 Intro to Economics ( F8)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ECON 100 Intro to Economics (F2 some sections, F8)

Required courses in other departments:

  • MATH 115 Applied Calculus (F6), MATH 116 Applied Calculus for Business, or MATH 122 (or higher) Calculus (F6)

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Fall of Year 3

AP credit:     Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

  • First-year students who have AP credit for BOTH micro and macro may register for Econ 201 or 202.

Courses that close quickly:

  • All 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • ECON 100 is a prerequisite for almost all upper-level classes 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • See Catalogue 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • See Catalogue 

Additional Notes:

  • Students with 4 or higher on both the Micro and Macro AP test can receive AP credit for ECON 100 and should look into taking ECON 290, ECON 201 and/or 202. 
  • MATH 111 is NOT a substitute for ECON 290.
  • Students interested in Graduate studies should take MATH 122, not MATH 115 or MATH 116.
  • First-year students interested in majoring in Economics should take ECON 100 during their first year.

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EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  Teaching and Learning; Community and Social Change; Policy and Reform
Total Credits Required for Major: 51 or 52 credits (depending on track and type of licensure; see Catalogue)
Minor:  Yes, 24 credits (see Catalogue)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • EDUC 201 Foundations of Education.
  • EDUC 220 Urban Education
  • Students planning to major in Educational Studies should take this as soon as possible.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • Foundations of Education EDUC 201. All upper-level Educational Studies courses require this course as a prerequisite.
  • Urban Education EDUC 220
  • Infant and Child Development PSYC 229 (elementary candidates take this course; some sections are F11)
  • Adolescence PSYC 230(secondary candidates take this course)
  • Educational Psychology PSYC 222
  • Any of the quantitative courses (PSYC 211, ECON 290, or MATH 111)
  • Philosophy of Education PHIL 270

Required courses in other departments:

  • Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the major, most Educational Studies courses are offered in other departments. Recommended courses vary depending on the student′s career goals.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • This list is extensive and will vary according to track. Please see Catalogue.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Second semester of second year for Elementary Education
  • First semester of the third year for Secondary Education and other tracks

AP credit:   No  

Courses that close quickly:

  • Most EDUC Studies courses fill quickly
  • EDUC 201 & EDUC 320 are typically the most in demand

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • EDUC 201 Foundations of Education should be taken as early as possible

Additional Notes

Students who want to be teachers should select the Teaching and Learning track.  There is an application to the licensure program to be completed as soon as students have completed the qualifying PRAXIS exams. Students seeking secondary licensure should double major in the content area in which they plan to teach. Students seeking elementary licensure are not required to double major. Refer to the Pre-Professional Education page for more details on the teaching and learning track. Students who are considering a major in Educational Studies should schedule a meeting with either Professor Person or Professor Casey.

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ENGLISH

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    Literature and Literature and Creative Writing
Total Credits Required for Major:  44 credits
Minor:    Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 190 Introductory Topics in Literature (F2i, F4). See BannerWeb or English Department website for current topics. Open to first-year students and sophomores only.
  • All 200-level English classes are open to first year students and carry (F4, F2I) credit. 
  • 285 is for prospective majors and should only be taken by those considering a major or minor in English.
  • 151 First-Year Writing Seminar or 155 Daily Themes (to be completed in the first year if no AP credit was earned). (F2s)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 285 English Seminar (F2i). Open to first-year students though typically taken during the sophomore year.

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Other humanities courses that complement a prospective major in English, e.g., literature courses taught in the Modern Languages and Literatures department, as well as courses in  History, Greek and Roman Studies, Art, Music, Religion, Sociology, Anthropology, and the like.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Fall or spring semester of the sophomore year (depending on other credits earned).

AP credit:      Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • 190 Introductory Topics in Literature (F2i, F4)
  • 210 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 225 Southern Literature (F2i, F4)
  • 220 Topics in Women and Literature 
  • 230 Shakespeare's Major Plays(F2i, F4)
  • 265 Special Topics courses (F2i, F4)
  • If these courses close, students should substitute other 200-level courses or wait for availability. 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • Majors should complete 285 before enrolling in Literary Theory classes or 485 Senior Seminar.Students must complete ENG 190 or a 200-level literature course or have permission from the instructor before taking 300-level literature courses; an ENG 210 before taking the 300 and 400-level Creative Writing Workshops. 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Consult Catalogue, especially for 300-level courses. 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • N/A   

Additional Notes: FYWS 151 and HUM 101 courses count towards te English major if they are taught be professors in the English Department. 

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  54-56
Minor:    Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • BIOL 120 Introduction to Environmental Science (F7) - FALL
  • BIOL 130 Biology 1(F7)- FALL
  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry (F7)-FALL and limited spots in SPRING
  • ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (F8)-FALL and SPRING
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology (F7) - FALL
  • ENVS 150 Environment and Society-FALL and SPRING
  • HIST 105 Diseases and Epidemics (F2i, F3) - FALL
  • HIST 207 Global Environmental History (F3, F11)- FALL
  • MATH 111 Introduction into Applied Statistics(F6)-FALL AND SPRING
  • MATH 211 Statistics for the Life Sciences-FALL and SPRING
  • MATH 214 Math Modeling with Bio Applications (F6)-FALL and SPRING
  • PHIL 230 Environmental Ethics - SPRING
  • RELS 101 Bible and City(F1)-FALL
  • RELS 101 Bible and Food(F1)-SPRING
  • URBN 201 Introduction to Urban Studies (F8, F11)-FALL and SPRING

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ENVS 150 Environment and Society - No prerequisites. Designed for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors and minors, but also suitable for non-minors, this course covers a variety of contemporary environmental issues. It is advised that student who want to major or minor in Environmental Sciences try to take this course in their first two years at Rhodes.
  • INTD 225 Geographic Information System (F6) – No prerequisites. In this course students learn to analyze spatial data and apply their skills to a research project. It is advised that students take this course in their first two years at Rhodes.

The following courses fulfill requirements, but are not in themselves required

  • BIOL Environmental Science (F7)  – No prerequisites. This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the environment as well as on people's impact upon the natural world.  This lecture course has accompanying laboratory that must be taken with the class.  This course will not satisfy a course requirement for the major in Biology.
  • Chemistry 120 Foundations of Chemistry I (F7)  – No prerequisites.  A study of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry.  This lecture course has accompanying laboratory (Chemistry 125) that must be taken with the class. Students who want to pursue Environmental Science and who are not in BIOL 130/131 or ENVS 111 should consider taking CHEM 120/125.
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology(F7)-No prerequisites. A study of geology of Earth. This course has a lecture and laboratory format. 

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA – since Environmental Sciences is a Program, and not a department, almost all of its required courses are in other departments.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Sophomore Year

AP credit:   Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • BIOL 120 Environmental Science (F7) - FALL
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology (F7) - FALL & SPRING
  • ENVS 150 Environment and Society-FALL & SPRING
  • HIST 105 Disease & Epidemics (F2i, F3) - FALL
  • INTD 225- Geographic Information Systems(GIS)-FALL & SPRING

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Introductory science courses (BIOL 130/131, ENVS 111, CHEM 120) are typically only taught during the fall semester. There are sometimes limited opportunities to take CHEM 120 in the spring. 

Additional Notes:

Although Introductory Biology I and II (BIOL 130/131 – FALL and BIOL 140/141 – Spring) are not required courses for ENVS majors, many of the upper-level Biology courses that ENVS majors may want to take have both BIOL 130/131 and BIOL 140/141 as prerequisites. If students have an interest in the bio-logical aspects of the environment, it is strongly suggested that students take BIOL 130/131 and BIOL 140/141 during their first or second year at Rhodes.

If a student wants to pursue an Environmental Science (BS) major, it is strongly encouraged that the student takes BIOL 120 and/or CHEM 120/125 and/or BIOL 130/131 and BIOL 140/141 during the first two years. Ideally, at least one of these science courses would be completed during the first semester at Rhodes.

Students considering an Environmental Science major or minor should take ENVS 150 as early as possible. It is also strongly suggested that students take INTD 225 Geographic Information Systems as early as possible, especially if the student is interested in pursuing certain internship and research opportunities.

Because Environmental Science is very interdisciplinary, students are encouraged to contact the Chair of the Environmental Studies & Sciences Program (Prof. Sarah Boyle) if they would like to discuss course options based on the academic and career interests of the student. Please note that we offer a major in Environmental Science (BS) and a major in Environmental Studies (BA). Students with environmental interests are invited to self-enroll in our Environmental Studies and Sciences Canvas site; this site provides detailed information about environmental opportunities at Rhodes.   Link to enroll:  https://rhodes.instructure.com/enroll/8BNCRT    

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  52
Minor:   Yes                           

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • BIOL 120 Introduction to Environmental Science (F7) - FALL
  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry (F7)-FALL & limited spots in the SPRING
  • ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (F8)-FALL & SPRING
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology (F7) – FALL & SPRING
  • ENVS 150 Environment and Society-FALL & SPRING
  • HIST 105 Diseases and Epidemics (F2i, F3) - FALL
  • HIST 105 Human Reproduction (F2i, F3) - FALL
  • HIST 207 Global Environmental History (F3, F11) - FALL
  • MATH 111 Introduction to Applied Statistics (F6)-FALL & SPRING
  • MATH 211 Statistics for the Life Sciences-FALL and SPRING
  • MATH 214 Mathematical Modeling with Bio Applications (F6) - FALL
  • PHIL 230 Environmental Ethics - SPRING
  • RELS 101 Bible and City (F1)- FALL
  • RELS 101 Bible and Food(F1)-SPRING
  • URBN 201 Introduction to Urban Studies (F8, F11)-FALL & SPRING

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ENVS 150 Environment and Society - No prerequisites. Designed for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors and minors, but also suitable for non-minors, this course covers a variety of contemporary environmental issues.
  • INTD 225 Geographic Information System (F6) - No prerequisites. In this course students learn to analyze spatial data and apply their skills to a research project. It is advised that students take this course in their first two years at Rhodes.
  • ECON 100 (F8). No prerequisites.  A survey of economic analysis and institutions combining economic theory with a discussion of applications to the U. S. economic system for majors and non-majors.  The course will include an introduction to both microeconomics and macroeconomics.

The following courses fulfill requirements, but are not in themselves required

  • HIST 105 Disease and Epidemics(F3, F2i)
  • RELS 101 Bible and City, Bible and Food(F1)
  • BIOL 120 Environmental Science (F7) – No prerequisites. This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the environment aswell as on people's impact upon the natural world.  This lecture course has accompanying laboratory that must be taken with the class.  This course will not satisfy a course requirement for the major in Biology.  
  • CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry I (F7) - No prerequisites.  A study of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry.  This lecture course has accompanying laboratory (CHEM 125) that must be taken with the class.
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology(F7)- No prerequisites. A study of the geology of Earth. This course has a lecture and laboratory format.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Sophomore year

AP credit:   Yes   (See AP Exam table for details)

Courses that close quickly:

  • BIOL 120: Environmental Science (F7) – FALL
  • ENVS 111 Physical Geology (F7) - FALL and SPRING
  • ENVS 150: Environment and Society-FALL and SPRING
  • HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics (F2i, F3)- FALL
  • INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems(GIS)-FALL and SPRING

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • RELS 101 and 102(Bible and City, Bible and Food) are for first year students. 
  • Introductory science courses (BIOL 130/131, ENVS 111, BIOL 120, CHEM 120) are typically only taught during the fall semester. There are sometimes opportunities to take CHEM 120 in the spring semester.

Additional Notes:

Students considering an Environmental Studies major or minor should take ENVS 150 as early as possible. It is also strongly suggested that students take INTD 225 Geographic Information Systems as early as possible, especially if the student is interested in pursuing certain internship and research opportunities.

For the first semester at Rhodes, students may want to consider taking ENVS 150, ENVS 111, HIST 105 (Disease & Epidemics), RELS 101 (Bible and City; Bible and Food), or BIOL 120.

Because Environmental Studies is very interdisciplinary, students are encouraged to contact the Chair of the Environmental Studies & Sciences Program (Prof. Sarah Boyle) if they would like to discuss course options based on the academic and career interests of the student. Please note that we offer a major in Environmental Science (BS) and a major in Environmental Studies (BA). Students with environmental interests are invited to self-enroll in our Environmental Studies and Sciences Canvas site; this site provides detailed information about environmental opportunities at Rhodes.   Link to enroll:  https://rhodes.instructure.com/enroll/8BNCRT

 

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GENDER & SEXUALITY STUDIES

Degree offered:   None
Minor:  Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Total Credits Required for Minor:  24

Elective courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • GSS 200
  • Any course listed by its home department as "appropriate for beginning students" that is also a GSS elective(A list of approved GSS electives is compiled every semester and distributed to the faculty and students. This information is also available in the online schedule of classes). 

Courses required for the minor and appropriate for beginning students:

  • GSST 200 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies. This course should be taken in the first or second year.

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • ANSO 231 Gender and Society

AP credit:    No                    

Courses that close quickly:

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • It is recommended that GSST 200 is taken during the first or second year and that GSST 400 is taken during the 3rd or 4th year. 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • GSST 200 (Fall)and GSST 400

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • GSST 400 (Spring) 

Additional Notes:

  • GSST 300 (Queer Thoeory) is recommended for the minor
  • 2 courses in the GSS minor may also be counted toward the student's major. 1 course in the GSS minor may also be counted toward another minor.

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GREEK & ROMAN STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin); Classical Studies; Material Culture
Total Credits Required for Major:  46
Minor:   Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • Humanities 101 - 102 The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion (F1)
  • GRRO 110(in the Fall) and 111(in the Spring) (F1)
  • Elementary Latin 101(offered only in the Spring)
  • Elementary Greek 101(offered only in the Fall)
  • Elementary Hebrew 101(offered only in the Fall)
  • GRRO 245 Ancient Philosophy(F2i, F4)
  • GRRO 285 Classical Myth in Modern Fimer(F4)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • GRS 275 Introduction to Classical Studies(to be offered in the spring of 2021)

Required courses in other departments:

  • GRS accepts numerous courses in other departments; nearly any course that focuses on the ancient Mediterranean, no matter what the department, counts toward a major or minor.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • ART 220 Classical Archaeology(F3 and F5)
  • HIST 211 The Ancient Mediterranean(F3) 
  • HUM 101-102 The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • With no prior experience in high school, students must begin the Greek or Latin sequence by fall of the junior year.  Some tracks of the major require an even earlier start to language study.

AP credit:   Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • Language sequences in Latin and Greek, although it is possible to start at a level higher than 101-with previous study in high school.

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

GRS 275 Introduction to Classical Studies is offered only every other year in the spring. This is a matter of special attention for students who plan to study abroad in the spring of the junior year.

Additional Notes:

  • GRS now offers courses in biblical Hebrew, although these at present do not count toward the major.  Students may fulfill the F10 second language requirement by successfully completing Hebrew 201.
  • GRS strongly recommends the Search sequence for students interested in ancient Greece and Rome.  We do offer a few courses for the Life program as well, but many of our courses will be building upon the common readings from Search.
  • Students can fulfill the F10 language proficiency requirement by passing an exam offered during August orientation.  Otherwise, students should register for the appropriate level of Latin or Greek based on their preparation in high school.

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HISTORY

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  44
Interdisciplinary Major: (See Catalogue for requirements)

  • History and International Studies – 48-52 credits

Minor:   Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 105 Introductory Seminars in History (F2i, F3).  These seminars are open to all students including those in their first year.  The courses are writing intensive and fulfill one of the “written communication” requirements (F2i), as well as the “historical forces” (F3) requirement. Students may count two courses at this level toward the history requirement.  No prerequisites are required.
  • Any course at the 200-level (see Catalogue).  The Department′s 200-level courses survey various historical topics but require no special background and are open to all students including those in their first and second year. All 200-level History courses count towards a major (and minor) in History,so are also suitable for students considering a major (or minor) in History. There are no prerequisites for 200-level courses. (F3, some F5, F8, F9)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • Any 200-level course (F3, some F5, F8, F9)
  • HIST 300 The Historian′s Craft (F2i).  This course is designed for majors or those seriously considering majoring in History only; this course also counts toward the History minor but is not required for the minor.  Ideally it should be taken sophomore year or no later than fall of the junior year, although highly-motivated first-year students who intend to major in History may also enroll after consulting with the instructor.

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Fall semester junior year

AP credit:   Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Credits earned through AP or IB do not fulfill the requirements of the History major or minor but do count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.  Students with AP credit who are considering a major in history should consider taking History 105 or any 200-level course in History.

Courses that close quickly:

  • 105 Introductory Seminars in History (F2i, F3)
  • 207 Global Environmental History (F3, F11)
  • 209 Politics of Natural Disasters (F3, F8)
  • 212 Medieval World (F3)
  • 226 Musical Paris (F3, F5)
  • 233 The U.S. in the 20th Century (F3, F8)
  • 242 African-American History (F3, F9)
  • 243 The Civil Rights Movement (F3)
  • 248 History of Memphis (F3)
  • 261 Colonial Latin America (F3, F9)
  • 262 Contemporary Latin America (F3, F9)
  • 275 Making of the Modern Middle East (F3, F9)
  • 277 Modern Islamic Thought (F1, F3)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NA 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA 

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • No more that two 105 courses may count toward the major or minor. 

Additional Notes:

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INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  48
Interdisciplinary Majors: Related "bridge" majors include

  • Economics-International Studies: 60 credits
  • History-International Studies: 48-52 credits
  • Political Science-International Studies: 52 credits
  • Russian Studies-International Studies: 56 credits

Minor:   Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • INTS 110 Introduction to International Relations (F3, F8). A survey of international relations theories and historical cases.
  • INTS 120 Introduction to Comparative Politics (F8).  An introduction to the study of domestic politics and governments around the world.
  • Note: the above courses do not have to be taken sequentially. 
  • The Department also offers two one-credit, evening courses appropriate for majors and non-majors.
    • INTS 133 Model United Nations. A simulation of UN proceedings enabling students to debate.
    • INTS 235 Great Decisions in Foreign Policy.Course features rotating lectures by departmental faculty on timely topics in politics and foreign policy.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • INTS 110 Introduction to International Relations (F3, F8)
  • INTS 120 Introduction to Comparative Politics (F8)

Required courses in other departments: 

  • Language - Course work through either 202 or 209 level is required; course work at the 300 level is strongly recommended.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Students should consult with a faculty member in the Department on an individual basis.

AP credit:  No                      

Courses that close quickly:

  • INTS 110 Introduction to International Studies (F3, F8)
  • INTS 120 Introduction to Comparative Politics (F8)
  • INTS 300 International Relations Theory

Courses that should be taken in sequence:

  • NA

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • It is recommended that students complete 270 and 300 before enrolling in 485.

​​Additional Notes:

  • Since majors must complete a foreign language study through the 202 level or pass the equivalent proficiency exam, early work in a foreign language is recommended.

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LATIN AMERICAN & LATINX STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  42-44
Minor:      Yes (See Catalogue for requirements. Updates in process. Please consult Prof Elizabeth Pettinaroli, pettanrolie@rhodes.edu)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • LTNS 200 Intro to Latin American & Latinx Studies(F3 some sections, F9)
  • BUS 200 Taxation of the Poor
  • ECON 100, Introduction to Economics(F8)
  • HIST 105 Latin America Through Film, (F2; F3)
  • HIS 261, Colonial Latin America (F3; F9)
  • LTNS American and LatinX Studies 306, Practicum in the Community
  • MLL 150 Portuguese
  • MUS 119 Music of Latin America(F5, F9)
  • POLS 207 Race and Ethnic Politics
  • SPAN 306 Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures (F4)
  • SPAN 365, Colonization and Decolonization(F9 in process)
  • Others by consultation with LALS Chair, Prof Elizabeth Pettinaroli

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • LTNS 200 Intro to Latin American & Latinx Studies (F3 some sections, F9)

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Interdisciplinary majors draw from various departments

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Often students who have fulfilled requirements in one or more of the participating departments can complete remaining major requirements even if they declare a LAS major rather late. Latest time to declare the major is Spring of Junior year.

AP credit:     By consultation with LALS chair, Prof. Elizabeth Pettinaroli

Courses that close quickly:

  • NA

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NA

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • NA 

Additional Notes:

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MATHEMATICS

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  49
Interdisciplinary Majors: (See Catalogue for requirements)

  • Biomathematics
  • Mathematics and Economics

Minor:  Mathematics Minor, Statistics Minor(See catalogue for requirements)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • MATH 107 Linear Methods (F6)
  • MATH 108 Cryptology (F6)
  • MATH 109 Excursions in Mathematics
  • MATH 111 Applied Statistics for Liberal Arts (F6)
  • MATH 112 Precalculus and Differential Calculus (only for students that have not taken any calculus)
  • MATH 115 Applied Calculus (F6)
  • MATH 116 Calculus with Business Applications (F6)
  • MATH 122 Integral Calculus (with any previous calculus class, AP credit, or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 201 Transition to Advanced Mathematics (With AP credit or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 211 Applied Statistics for the Formal & Natural Sciences (F6)
  • MATH 214 Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications (F6)
  • MATH 223 Multivariable Calculus (with AP credit or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 251 Differential Equations (with AP credit or equivalent)  (F6)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • MATH 122 Integral Calculus (with AP credit or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 201 Transition to Advanced Mathematics (With AP credit or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 214 Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications (F6)(required for Biomath)
  • MATH 211 Applied Statistics for the Formal and Natural Sciences(F6)(Required for Statistics minor unless students plan to take ECON 290 or PSYCH 211)
  • MATH 223 Multivariable Calculus (with AP credit or equivalent) (F6)
  • MATH 251 Differential Equations (with AP credit or equivalent)  (F6)

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • An appropriate calculus course should be taken by spring of the first year at the latest

AP credit:   Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Students with AP credit (or the equivalent) and interest in a possible major in Mathematics, Biomathematics, or Mathematics and Economics should consult a member of the department.

Courses that close quickly:

  • MATH 111 Applied Statistics for Liberal Arts (F6)
  • MATH 115 Applied Calculus (F6)
  • 116 Calculus with Business Applications (F6)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NA;  for upper-level courses, see individual listings in Catalogue

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Fall: 112, 201, 214, 251
  • Spring: 109

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • MATH 107 Linear Methods (F6)
  • MATH 111 Applied Statistics for Liberal Arts (F6)
  • MATH 112 Precalculus and Differential Calculus
  • MATH 115 Applied Calculus (F6)
  • MATH 116 Calculus with Business Applications (F6)

Additional Notes:

  • Prospective math majors should complete at least 122 Integral Calculus by the end of their first year.
  • Students who have any prior experience with calculus should begin with MATH 122 or MATH 211 or MATH 214.  Students should NOT take MATH 112 if they plan to take only one semester of calculus or if they have already seen derivatives in a previous class. Students who have taken calculus in high school may not earn credit for MATH 112 without permission from the instructor
  • Prospectice biomath majors should complete at least MATH 122, MATH 211, or MATH 214 by the end of their first year.
  • Students who have AP credit for MATH 122  (a 4 or 5 on the BC exam) should begin with either MATH 223, MATH 201, MATH 211, MATH 214, or MATH 251.  A student should consult a faculty member of the department for assistance in deciding which of these courses would be most appropriate.
  • Students interested in biomathematics or applied mathematics should consider taking 214.
  • Student interested in the statistics minor should take MATH 211 unless they plan to take ECON 290 or PSYCH 211.

     For further questions on calculus placement, consult a mathematics faculty member.

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MEDIA STUDIES

Degree offered:  BA
Major: Yes (Media Studies)
Total Credits Required for Major: 40

Minor: Yes(See catalogue for requirements)

Total Credits Required For Minor: 20

 

Elective courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • ART 102: Intro into Digital Art(F5)
  • HIST 105 British Empure through Film(F2i, F3)
  • MST 120 Acting for New Media
  • MST 240 Public Speaking
  • PHIL 101 Black Mirror and Philosophy(F2i)

Courses required for the minor and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ART 102(F5)

Required courses in other departments:

  • N/A

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • N/A

AP credit:  No                      

Courses that close quickly:

  • Most 100- and 200-level courses close quickly

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • N/A

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • N/A

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  •   N/A

Additional Notes: The faculty has just approved the Media Studies major, so some of the information may not be available in the catalog. Please contact Rasha Richards at richardsr@rhodes.edu with any questions. 

 

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MODERN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES

Degree offered:   BA
Majors:  Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Russian Studies, and Spanish
Total Credits Required for Major:  36 - 41
Interdisciplinary Major: (see catalogue for requirements)Russian Studies and International Studies (See Catalogue for requirements)
Minors:  Chinese Studies, French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Russian Studies, and Spanish

For information on specific language programs, please contact the following Program Directors:

Chinese – Dr. Han Li (hanl@rhodes.edu )
French – Dr. Laura Loth (lothl@rhodes.edu )
German – Dr. Elizabeth Bridges (bridgese@rhodes.edu )
Russian – Dr. Sasha Kostina (kostina@rhodes.edu )
Spanish – Dr. Clara Pascual-Argente(argentec@rhodes.edu)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • Students planning to fulfill Rhodes’ foreign language degree requirement in a language not previously studied should register for the 101 course in that language.
  • All first-year students should begin language study in the first semester if at all possible.
  • Students with two or more years of a language in high school (or two or more block-schedule courses) MAY NOT take 101 courses in that language for credit.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • Required courses for majors vary according to the target language studied.

Required courses in other departments:

  • Russian Studies and Chinese Studies majors and minors require courses in other departments. Please consult the Catalogue.

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Individual language sections encourage students to pursue a variety of different courses in the Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences & Fine Arts.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • In most cases, 202 should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

AP credit: Yes (See AP Policy in Language Requirements and/or AP Exam Table for details)

Courses that close quickly:

  • 101, 102, 201, 202

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • The sequencing of courses varies depending on the language section, but normally 101, 102, 201, 202, 301 must be taken prior to upper-level courses taught in the target language.

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • Sequenced courses as well as others with pre-requisites that have not yet been completed. Please see the Catalogue for details.

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Varies according to the language section 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • Chinese, Russian, and Spanish 101, 102, 201, and in Chinese and Spanish, 202.
  • The German program has recently redesigned its major and minor requirements; please check the most recent catalogue for details. The French major and minor begins in 201 or above.Please see the major requirements under the appropriate language section description in the Catalogue for additional courses that do no count towards the major. 

Additional Notes:

Students should look in MLL offerings for regular opportunities to study topics in literature and culture in English translation. These courses most often do not have prerequisites, and usually earn Foundation credits.

In addition to courses offered under Chinese, French, German, Russian, and Spanish headings, MLL offers courses in linguistics (MLL 280), language acquisition pedagogy (MLL 240), internships (MLL 460), and a number of opportunities under the MLL Fellowships heading.

Rhodes’ foreign language proficiency requirement may be fulfilled in any one of the following ways:

  • by successfully completing at Rhodes any appropriate four-credit language course numbered 201 or higher and taught in the target language.
  • by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty, following additional proficiency testing. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency (see above) in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes.
  • by achieving proficiency with Advanced Placement credit as defined in the AP/IB Policy (please note that additional proficiency testing is required before AP/IB credits are counted).

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MUSIC

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  52
Interdisciplinary Major: Music and Psychology (See Catalogue for requirements.)
Minor:   Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

** Students interested in the major or minor should take the Music Theory Placement Exam. Follow the links on the “New Student” page or contact the Theory Coordinator, Dr. Courtenay Harter (harterc@rhodes.edu).

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • Any 100-level course, Fall 2021 includes: 
    • 101(F5), 103(F5), 118(F5 & F9), 119(F5 &F9), 120(F3 & F5),140(F5) 
  • Courses without prerequisites include 100-level courses : 262(F2 credits)
  • Applied lessons and/or ensembles*(F5 with 4 semesters)
  • 204 Understanding Musicianship(F5) may be taken with appropriate score on the placement test. **

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 204 Understanding Musicianship (F5)**

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • MUSIC 204  should be started no later than the sophomore year. 

AP credit:  Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that must be taken in sequence: (See prerequisites in Catalogue.)

  • 204 is a prerequisite for more advanced courses in Music Theory- see Catalogue for a complete listing.  Note: 227, 228 do not need to be taken in sequence and are NOT recommended for first-year students.)   

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  •  Offered only in Fall: 204, 227
  • Offered only in Spring: 228

Courses that close quickly:

  •   101, 117, 118, 119, 222

*Music Fees:

There are fees connected to Applied Music lessons which are waived if a student has received a Fine Arts Scholarship and is registered in an appropriate large ensemble, or once a music major or minor has been officially declared (please see the College Catalogue for complete information on fees).

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NEUROSCIENCE

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks:    NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  54-58
Minor:    No                          

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • See below 

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • BIOL 130, 131L Biology I (F7). Recommended for the Fall semester, 1st year.
  • BIOL 140, 141L Biology II. Recommended for the Spring semester, 1st year.
  • PSYC 150 Introduction to Psychological Science (F8). Recommended for the Fall or Spring semester, 1st year.
  • CHEM 120, 120L Foundations of Chemistry (F7). Recommended for second year.
  • NEUR 270: We recommend that students take BIOL 130 & 140, as well as PSYCH 150 before taking NEUR 270. However, BIOL 140 can also be taken concurrently. For instance, if students take BIOL 130 and PSYC 150 in the Fall semester, they can take BIOL 140 and NEUR 270 in the Spring semester. Otherwise, we strongly recommend that students take NEUR 270 in their second year, preferably in the Fall semester, as having this course will aid them with upper level depth courses.
  • NEUR 299 Topics in Neuroscience, PHIL 330 Philosophy and Neuroscience, or PHIL 340 Philosophy and Cognitive Science are recommended for second year or later. These are not required for all majors, but are options within a list of breadth courses, from which 2 courses are required.
  • PSYC 211 or MATH 211 Statistics. Recommended any time that it fits into student schedules.

Students may also start taking their Neuroscience depth courses (BIOL 375/376, PSYC 344/345) in their second year after having completed the introductory course requirements. Having NEUR 270 before taking depth courses is not a prerequisite to these courses but is helpful.

Required courses in other departments:

  • See above

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • See above

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Sophomore year because of the sequential nature of the major and competition for seats in the Biology and Psychology courses with their majors.  Therefore, students should have completed PSYC 150, BIOL 140+Lab and/or CHEM 120, and NEUR 270 by the spring semester of their sophomore year.
  • If students have already taken the introductory Biology, Chemistry, and Psychology courses, they can still take NEUR270 in their junior year and graduate on time, although this is not recommended.

AP credit:     Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • There is a lot of demand for upper-level depth courses with labs (BIOL 375/376, PSYC 344/345) as well as PSYC 318 Clinical Neuroscience.

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NEUR 270 and the depth classes (BIOL 375/376, PSYC 344/345) require successful completion of either BIOL 140 + 141 or PSYC 150 as specified. 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • N/A

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • N/A   

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • BIOL 105, 200, 201, 202, 206, 209, 212, 214, 240, 250, 252-254, 301, 315, 330, 350, 360, 380, 460
  • PSYC 105, 222, 225, 230, 309, 311, 323, 338, 350-352, 399, 460

Additional Notes:

  • In their first year, prospective Neuroscience majors should try to take both BIO 130/131L and 140/140L and PSYC 150. This will provide the most flexibility in their 4 year planning.
  • We also recommend that prospective majors take both the introductory Biology and the introductory Psychology courses before taking NEUR 270. Students intending on majoring are strongly encouraged to have completed NEUR 270 within their first two years.

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PHILOSOPHY

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  44
Minor:   Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

 

  • 101.01 Force of Reason (F2i). All important human questions ultimately become philosophical questions. Philosophy is the exploration of how and what we can know, and this course will engage us in that indispensable enterprise.
  • 101.02 Black Mirror and Philosophy (F2i). Students in this course use Black Mirror episodes to investigate philosophical topics such as the moral status of animals, the ethics of creating “better” humans, machine consciousness, personal autonomy, digital ethics and more.   Throughout the course, students will learn key argumentation and writing skills.
  • 101.03 Philosophy and Science Fiction (F2i). This course explores philosophical topics in science fiction including time travel, teleportation, robot consciousness, and mind uploading. Students will become familiar with philosophical issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the nature of mind, consciousness, personal identity, time, free will, and knowledge.
  • 110. Political Questions (F2i, F8; also the introductory course for the Political Economy major)
  • 206. Logic (F6)
  • 216. Philosophy of Law
  • 218. Justice, Equality and Liberty (F8)
  • 250. The Ethics and Law of Freedom of Speech and Expression
  • 301. Ethics (F1)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 200 Critical Reasoning

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Fall semester of Junior year

AP credit:    No    

Courses that close quickly:

  • All PHIL classes tend to close quickly.

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • None, though we recommend taking Introduction to Philosophy and Critical Reasoning Early. 

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Our 101 courses are restricted to first and second year students

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • NA

Additional Notes:

  • Philosophy courses focus on helping students develop their critical reasoning and writing skills, which are essential for college success. Many of our majors use their philosophy background as a foundation for other graduate level programs such as law school or medical school. Indeed, Philosophy majors routinely score among the highest compared to other undergraduate majors on the LSAT.
  • Students interested in Philosophy are encouraged to discuss their interests with any Philosophy faculty member. Philosophy faculty members include Profs. Daniel Cullen, Steve Wirls, Rebecca Tuvel, Erin Dolgoy, and Jared Millson.   

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PHYSICS

Degree offered:   BS
Tracks: NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  51
Minor:    Yes   (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 101 Astronomy (F7). Designed for non-science majors. Lecture and required laboratory(102) must be taken together.
  • 107 Physics of Sound and Music (F7). Designed for non-science majors. 
  • 109-110 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences I and II (F7). Lecture and required laboratory (lab 113-114) must be taken together.
  • 111-112 Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I and II (F6, F7). Lecture and required laboratory (PHYS 113-114) must be taken together.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 111-112 Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I and II (F6, F7). Lecture and required laboratory(PHYS 113-114) must be taken together.
  • A course in differential calculus must be satisfied in high school or by MATH 121-Precalculus and Differential Calculus.

Required courses in other departments:

  • Mathematics 122 Integral Calculus (F6)
  • Mathematics 223 Multivariable Calculus (F6)

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Computer Science 141 (F6)
  • Mathematics 251, 261 (F6)
  • Chemistry 120 and required laboratory 125 (F7)

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Fall semester of sophomore year

AP credit:     Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • 102 Astronomy (F7)
  • 107 Physics of Sound and Music (F7)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 109-110 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences I and II (F7)
  • 111-112 Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I and II (F6, F7)

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • See course prerequisites in College Catalogue.

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • All courses 

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • 101 Astronomy (F7)
  • 105 Topics in Physics (F7) 
  • 107 Physics of Sound and Music (F7)

Additional Notes:

  • The appropriate lab for PHYS 109 and 111 is PHYS 113. Likewise, the appropriate lab for PHYS 110 and 112 is PHYS 114.
  • For potential physics majors, the first course is Physics 111 (and lab 113).  This course is calculus-based, thus a background in differential calculus (or concurrent enrollment in MATH 112) is necessary for this course.
  • For pre-health students not majoring in physics, the first course is PHYS 109 (and lab 113). This course is algebra-based and has no co-requisites. Knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is expected.
  • PHYS 111 is NEVER closed to first-year students.  Contact the department if a first-year student has difficulty enrolling in Physics 111.
  • For students interested in the dual/degree engineering programs, contact Prof. Viano (viano@rhodes.edu x3912) for advice as early as possible.
    • PHYS 111-112 (and labs 113-114) is required for all dual degree engineering programs and is usually taken in the first year.
    • MATH 112 (if necessary), 122, 223, 251 are required for all dual degree programs.

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POLITICAL ECONOMY

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:    Global, Historical, Philosophical, or Policy
Total Credits Required for Major:  48
Minor:      No                   

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  •  ECON 100, PHIL 110

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • ECON 100, POLS 110 

Required courses in other departments:

  • ECON 100, and 323
  • ECON 201 or 202
  • INTL 311
  • PLAW 205
  • POLS 110, 218, and 345

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • N/A

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • N/A

AP credit:    Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • NA

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • ECON 100 is a pre-requisite for all other ECON courses in the major.

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • N/A

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • N/A

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • N/A

Additional Notes:

  • Students interested in Political Economy are encouraged to discuss their interests with one of the P.E. Program faculty members.  For the 2021-22 academic year, P.E. Program faculty members are Profs. Shameel Ahmad (ECON), Stephen Ceccoli (INTS), Courtney Collins (ECON), Daniel Cullen (PHIL), Rebecca Tuvel (PHIL) and Stephen Wirls (PHIL).

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POLITICS and LAW

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:   NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  48
Interdisciplinary Major: Political Science & International Studies (See Catalogue for requirements)
Minor:   Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • PLAW 151 United States Politics (F8, F2i some sections). U.S. Politics is an intensive introduction examining the foundation and purposes of American government in the United States.  This course is a requirement for most upper-division coursework in political science and is a requirement for the major. 
  • PLAW 110 is not required for the major

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

 

  • PLAW 151 United States Politics (F8, F2i some sections). 

  • After PLAW 151 is completed, we recommend taking 200 level courses that sound interesting to the student. After the student has earned some additional 200 level credits in areas of interest, PLAW 270 is appropriate for sophomores in their second semester or juniors to provide them with the methodological foundations to understand approaches to answering questions from a range of disciplinary subfields. Ideally this course would be taken by the fall of the junior year, but definitely by the end of the junior year. 

Required courses in other departments:

  • International Studies 110 or 120 (both F8)

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • The Search Program (HUM 101, 102, 201-Politics Track) (F1)
  • See Additional Notes below.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Spring semester sophomore year

AP credit:     Yes   (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

Most sections of 151 close very quickly.  At the 200 level, Justice Equality Liberty, Media & Politics, Philosophy of Law, Politics and Literature, Southern Politics,  and Urban Politics and Policy close quickly.  Each 200-level course listed above may be offered once a year only.  Topics courses at any level also tend to close quickly.

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 151 should be taken before other political science courses.
  • Students should take PLAW 270 in the spring of their sophomore year or in fall of their junior year as this is a methods of inquiry course that will assist them in understanding material from most 300-level courses in the discipline. 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • Most courses outside of 151, 110, 270, and the senior seminar are offered only once per year or less frequently.

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • 262 (Mock Trial), 263 (Trial Procedures) and 264 (Advanced Trial Concepts) are courses that do not count toward the major but may be of interest to students wanting to pursue legal studies or a career in law.

Additional Notes:

Depending upon students’ specific interests, they may also find introductory-level courses in Economics, Philosophy, Psychology, History and/or Urban Studies to be complementary to their political science courses.  Students in other majors with interests in topics like data analytics, education, health, media, neuroscience, psychology and/or technology may find specific electives to be complementary to the courses of study in their majors.  Interested students may earn F11 internship credits through participation in PLAW 460 (generally after the sophomore year).  Please contact the department chair with further questions.       

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PSYCHOLOGY

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  44
Interdisciplinary Majors (See Catalogue for requirements.) 

  • Music and Psychology 
  • Neuroscience 
  • Educational Studies 

Minor:   Yes (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • Psychology courses numbered below 200 have no prerequisites.

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • Topics in Psychology PSY 105 (F8 some sections). Courses numbered below 150 are designed to introduce students to psychology in the context of one particular issue or problem. One of these courses can count toward the major, but they are designed for non-majors.
  • Introduction to Psychological Science PSY 150 (F8). Most upper-level psychology courses require this course as a prerequisite. Non-majors interested in further study in the department or in psychology-related careers should enroll in this course. Students interested in medical school should also enroll in this course.
  • Research Methods and Statistics PSY 200. Required of all majors and minors. Students will be taught critical thinking and scientific reasoning, basic experimental design, and elementary statistics. Students planning to major in psychology should take this as soon as possible.
  • Statistical Methods PSY 211 (F6).  Required of all majors.  Statistical methods are an integral part of social sciences, particularly psychology, as they provide the tools that are needed to reveal patterns in complex behavior.  Students will develop an appreciation of the role of statistics and knowledge of the major tests that demonstrate differences and relationships.  Students planning to major in psychology should take this class as soon as possible.

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • Recommended courses vary depending on the student′s career goals.

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • First semester of second year. 

AP credit:    Yes (See AP Exam table for details.)

Courses that close quickly:

  • Most psychology courses close in pre-registration. Students will need to put psychology courses high in the registration tree. 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 200 should be taken after 150
  • 200 and 211 can be taken in any order or concurrently
  • All 300 level courses should be taken after 150, 200 and 211
  • Advanced Topics in Research Methods (350 – 352) must be taken in the Junior Year

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • a second 105 Topics course 

Additional Notes:

In the following cases, prerequisites can be waived:

  • 222 Educational Psychology— Educational Studies minors need not take Psych 150.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA
Tracks:  NA
Total Credits Required for Major:  36
Minor:     Yes    (See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students (First Year Students ONLY):

  • 101 The Bible: Texts and Contexts (F1)
  • 102 The Bible: Texts and Contexts (F1, F2i)
  • Note: The entire sequence must be taken during the first year and must be completed before taking any RELS 200-level course

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • NA

Required courses in other departments:

  • NA

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • NA

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Second semester sophomore year

AP credit:      No  

Courses that close quickly:

  • All 100- and 200-level courses 

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • 255 and 256 are recommended, but not required, to be taken in sequence. 

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • 101 The Bible: Texts and Contexts - Fall semester
  • 102 The Bible: Texts and Contexts - Spring semester
  • 485 Senior Seminar - Spring semester

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  •   NA

Additional Notes:

  • First-year students need to take a whole year of either Search (Hum) or Life (RELS). Students should not register for any other RS courses in their first year, with rare exceptions, and in no case for any RS courses other than Life or Search in their first semester.
  • If a student wishes to major or minor in Religious Studies, either RELS 101-102 or HUM 101-102 will constitute the first required courses.  A student not in the Life track who plans to major or minor in Religious Studies should take HUM 201, Religious Studies track, in his or her sophomore year.
  • Students who have completed the first-year Search or Life se-quence should not enroll in another RELS 101-102 class in a sub-sequent year.

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URBAN STUDIES

Degree offered:   BA in Urban Studies and Health Equity(two majors)
Total Credits Required for Major:  44
Minor:     Yes, Urban Studies and Urban & Health Equity(See Catalogue for requirements.)

Courses appropriate for beginning students:

  • 201 Introduction to Urban Studies (F8, F11)

Courses required for majors and appropriate for beginning students:

  • 201 Introduction to Urban Studies (F8, F11)

Required courses in other departments:

  • N/A

Recommended courses in other departments:

  • N/A

Latest time to begin a major and graduate on schedule:

  • Spring of second year

AP credit:      No                  

Courses that close quickly:

  • 201 Introduction to Urban Studies (F8, F11)

Courses that must be taken in sequence:

  • NA

Courses not to be taken concurrently:

  • NA

Courses with time-of-year limitations:

  • NA

Courses that don’t count toward a major:

  • NA

Additional Notes:

  • Students interested in majoring or minoring in Urban Studies should enroll in 201: Introduction to Urban Studies, in their first year or fall of second year.
  • Students interested in Urban Studies are encouraged to contact Professor Thomas (thomase@rhodes.edu), Chair of Urban Studies, to learn more about the program.

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